Articles in the ‘FDA Recalls’ Category

American Regent Voluntarily Recalls All Lots of Ketorolac Tromethamine Injection, USP 30 mg/mL; 1mL and 2mL Single Dose Vials

American Regent conducts nationwide voluntary recall of ALL lots of its Ketorolac Tromethamine Injection, USP 30 mg/mL:

  • NDC# 0517-0801-25 30 mg/mL 1mL Single Dose Vial
  • NDC# 0517-0902-25 30mg/mL 2mL Single Dose Vial (60mg/2mL)

This voluntary recall is due to the potential that particulate matter in conjunction with crystallization may be present in the product. This recall does not include other concentrations of AMERICAN REGENT Ketorolac Tromethamine Injection, USP. American Regent is undertaking this recall in consideration of the potential for safety issues if the product is administered to patients, including obstruction of blood vessels which can induce pulmonary emboli or thrombosis, activate platelets and/or neutrophils to induce anaphylactic reactions. Other adverse effects associated with the injection of particulate matter include foreign body granulomas, and local irritation at the injection site.

The product was distributed to wholesalers and distributors nationwide and to one account in Abu Dhabi.

Hospitals, surgi-centers, clinics and other healthcare facilities should not use any AMERICAN REGENT Ketorolac Tromethamine Injection, USP Injection 30 mg/mL for patient care and should immediately quarantine any product for return.

“Patient safety is our primary concern, and we are committed to taking the necessary steps to protect patients from any potential safety risks,” said Mary Jane Helenek, President and CEO of American Regent.

On Friday, October 16, 2009, American Regent voluntarily recalled ALL unexpired lots of Ketorolac Tromethamine Injection, USP, 30 mg/mL due to the presence of particulate matter in conjunction with crystallization. This recall does not affect the other strength of Ketorolac Tromethamine Injection, USP, 15mg/mL, 1 mL Single Dose Vial, NDC # 0517-0601-25.

While American Regent continues to investigate this issue, the company is taking precautionary action and initiated this voluntary recall. American Regent has informed the FDA of its actions and is maintaining ongoing discussions with the Agency.

As is standard practice, and as stated in the Ketorolac Tromethamine Injection Product Package Insert, “Parenteral drug products should be inspected visually for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration whenever solution and container permit.”

American Regent will credit accounts for all returned Ketorolac Tromethamine Injection, USP product. Those with questions about the return process, please call our Customer Service Department at 1-800-645-1706: Monday thru Friday from 8:30 AM to 7:00 PM ET.

Hospitals, surgi-centers, clinics and healthcare providers, or patients with other questions may contact the Professional Services Department at 631-924-4000.

Any adverse reactions experienced with the use of this product, and/or quality problems should be reported to American Regent, Inc. via email at PV@luitpold.com, by fax to 610-650-7781 or 610-650-0170 or by phone at 1-800-734-9236. Adverse reactions may also be reported to FDA’s MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online, by phone [1-800-FDA-1088], or by returning the postage paid FDA form 3500, by mail to [MedWatch, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20852-9787] or via fax [1-800-FDA-0178].

Ketorolac Tromethamine Injection, USP is manufactured by Luitpold Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and is distributed by American Regent, Inc. (Shirley, NY).

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Unomedical Inc., a manufacturer of medical devices, today announced that it is conducting a voluntary recall of certain units of the single-patient use Manual Pulmonary Resuscitator (MPR). The recall only impacts MPRs manufactured from July 2002 – March 2008 and matching the lot numbers listed on the following Unomedical web page: Unomedical MPR Recall. This recall is being conducted because of a potential malfunction of certain units of the MPR, which may impair the ability of the device to generate the positive pressure necessary to function properly. The occurrence of such a malfunction may create a situation in which the use of the product could potentially cause serious adverse health consequences or death. This recall does not impact any MPRs manufactured after March 2008.

Unomedical is contacting customers to arrange for the return and credit of all MPR units subject to this recall by sending notification letters to distributors and customers. In addition, the company has set up a web page with a list of affected lot numbers, guidance (diagram and photos) to allow customers to identify products subject to the recall in the event that the customer has already removed the primary product packaging, and instructions on what actions to take.

In order to distinguish between the recalled product and unaffected product, customers may examine the patient valve housing immediately below the right-angle exhalation port, where the retention ring should be visible. MPR units with a clear or transparent ring, as well as those where no ring can be seen, should be returned to Unomedical as instructed. MPR units with a clearly visible blue retention ring are not affected and do not need to be returned.

The MPR is a single-patient use device used by healthcare professionals. It is intended for patients requiring total or intermittent ventilatory support.

Unomedical notified the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) of its decision to voluntarily recall the product on October 1, 2009.

Customers with questions are urged to contact Unomedical at 1-800-634-6003. Any adverse reactions experienced with the use of this product, and/or quality problems can also be reported to the FDA’s MedWatch Program by phone at 1-800-FDA-1088, by Fax at 1-800-FDA-0178, by mail at MedWatch, HF- 2, FDA, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20852-9787, or on the MedWatch website at: www.fda.gov/medwatch.

Philips announced today that it is voluntarily recalling approximately 5,400 HeartStart FR2+ automated external defibrillators (AEDs). This recall is being conducted due to the possibility of a memory chip failure that may render the device inoperable. Only certain HeartStart FR2+ AEDs (models M3860A and M3861A, distributed by Philips; and models M3840A and M3841A, distributed by Laerdal Medical) manufactured between May, 2007 and January, 2008 are included in the voluntary recall.

The HeartStart FR2+ defibrillators are used by trained responders and designated response teams to help treat sudden cardiac arrest. The device automatically analyzes the heart rhythm and determines whether a defibrillation shock is needed. If a shockable rhythm is detected, the FR2+ instructs the responder to deliver defibrillation therapy.

Philips has received reports of a memory chip failure in a small number of FR2+ units manufactured in 2007 and early 2008. These reported failures were detected during routine self tests, not during emergency use of the AED. Failure of this chip could render the AED inoperable and prevent it from delivering therapy when indicated, although Philips has received no reports of injury associated with this chip failure.

The AEDs affected by this recall have been distributed globally to fire departments, emergency medical services, hospitals, and other organizations. Philips is contacting customers to arrange for the return and replacement of all the recalled AEDs by sending notification letters to distributors and users. In addition, the company has set up a page on the Philips Web site with a serial number look-up tool to allow customers to find out if their FR2+ is part of this recall, as well as instructions on what to do if it is. The webpage is: www.philips.com/FR2PlusAction.

Philips has notified the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) of its decision to voluntarily recall the affected product. Customers who have questions about the recall or wish to report product problems may contact HeartStart Customer Service at 1-800-263-3342.

Any adverse events experienced with the use of this product should be reported to the FDA’s MedWatch Program by phone at 1-800-FDA-1088, by fax at 1-800-FDA-0178, by mail at MedWatch, HF-2, FDA, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20852-9787, or on the MedWatch Web site at: www.fda.gov/medwatch.

Today, Genentech, the manufacturer of the psoriasis drug Raptiva (efalizumab), announced that it has begun a voluntary, phased withdrawal of the product from the U.S. market. The company is taking this action because of a potential risk to patients of developing progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a rare, serious, progressive neurologic disease caused by a virus that affects the central nervous system. By June 8, 2009, Raptiva will no longer be available in the United States.

Prescribers are being asked not to initiate Raptiva treatment for any new patients. Prescribers should immediately begin discussing with patients currently using Raptiva on how to transition to alternative therapies. The FDA strongly recommends that patients work with their health care professional to transition to other alternative therapies for psoriasis.

The risk that an individual patient taking Raptiva will develop PML is rare and is generally associated with long-term use. Generally, PML occurs in people whose immune systems have been severely weakened and often leads to an irreversible decline in neurologic function and death. There is no known effective treatment for PML. On Oct. 16, 2008, FDA updated the FDA-approved labeling for Raptiva to warn of the risk of life-threatening infections, including PML. On Feb. 19, 2009, the FDA issued a Public Health Advisory informing patients and prescribers of the risk of PML in patients taking Raptiva, after receiving reports of four patients with PML, three of whom died. On March 13, 2009, the FDA approved a Medication Guide for Raptiva and included additional information in Raptiva’s labeling regarding PML.

Raptiva was approved by the FDA in 2003. It is a once-weekly injection for adults with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis.

Prescribers should continue to monitor patients on Raptiva for neurologic symptoms that might represent PML.

U.S. FDA

Class A Recall – Polar Care – Medical & Radiation Emitting Device Recalls 

Date Posted August 20, 2008
Recall Number N-0015-2008
Product BREG’s Polar Care 500, Part # 02019; Polar Care 500 Lite, Part # 02020; Polar Care 300, Part #28021.Used for cold therapy after orthopedic surgery.
Code Information All units of the listed models are affected
Recalling Firm/
Manufacturer
Breg Inc, An Orthofix Company
2611 Commerce Way
Vista, California 92081-8439
For Additional Information Contact Kathleen Barber
760-599-5719
Reason for
Recall
This Patient Safety Advisory was initiated to remind users of the risk of cold induced injuries and recommend important safety precautions for BREG Polar Care products.
Action Breg sent a Patient Safety Advisory notice “Dear Dr. letter” dated 09/19/2006 to Distributors & Medical Professionals. The purpose of the letter was to re-educate the orthopedic medical community of the risk of cold induced injuries from cold therapy, including Breg Polar Care products, and to recommend important patient safety precautions, such as not using cold therapy on patients with contraindications and providing a written treatment protocol for each patient. Breg sent a letter, dated May 1, 2007 to all customers, explaining that Breg changed the labeling and instructions with simplified graphics.
Quantity in Commerce 718,000
Distribution Nationwide Distribution.
   

Digitek Digoxin Recall

Previously Investigated Drugs – No Longer Accepting Cases

At this time our law firm is no longer accepting new cases involving this drug. This does not mean that you do not have a case; please seek a second opinion with local legal counsel to discuss your options.


DigitekThe drug manufacturer Actavis Totowa LLC notified healthcare professionals of a Class I nationwide recall of all strengths of Digitek, a drug used to treat heart failure and abnormal heart rhythms. The products are distributed by Mylan Pharmaceuticals Inc., under a “Bertek” label and by UDL Laboratories, Inc. under a “UDL” label. The defective drug is being recalled due to the possibility that tablets with double the appropriate thickness may contain twice the approved level of active ingredient. The existence of double strength tablets poses a serious risk of digitalis toxicity in patients with renal failure. Symptoms of digitalis toxicity include: nausea, vomiting, dizziness, low blood pressure, cardiac instability and bradycardia. Several reports of illnesses and injuries have been reported to the FDA. Patients should contact their healthcare professional with questions regarding this medication.

Bayer Suspends Sales of Trasylol.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today announced that, at the agency’s request, Bayer Pharmaceuticals Corp. has agreed to a marketing suspension of Trasylol, a drug used to control bleeding during heart surgery, pending detailed review of preliminary results from a Canadian study that suggested an increased risk for death. This Trasylol recall or marketing suspension follows two scientific studies confirming the serious dangers of the drug. The initial study, which was the largest worldwide Trasylol study ever conducted, was performed by Dr. Dennis Mangano, the same physician who warned the FDA two years ago about the serious side effects of Trasylol.

According to the Wall Street Journal, Bayer said its decision came in the wake of requests or orders from regulators in the U.S., Canada, Germany and other countries. Trasylol, which is supposed to reduce blood loss and allow patients undergoing heart-bypass surgery to avoid transfusions, is the third drug this year whose sale in the U.S. has been halted under scrutiny from the Food and Drug Administration, a signal of how the agency is weighing safety issues heavily in drug decisions.

Still, the history of Trasylol, which was approved in the U.S. in 1993 and has been tied to high-profile safety concerns at least since early 2006, is likely to draw questions from Congress and plaintiff attorneys. It took the FDA eight months to initiate the widespread recall after the physicians’ warnings. These delays in action have been estimated to cause the death of 1,000 patients each month. Bayer has been accused of withholding negative reports about Trasylol from the FDA in order to maintain profits.