Transposition of the Great Arteries Birth Defect Lawsuit

May 30, 2011

What is Transposition of the Great Arteries?


Transposition of the great arteries (TGA) occurs when an infant is born with the two main arteries carrying blood from the heart reversed. Normally, the blood flows from body to heart to lungs to heart to body, but when transposition of the great arteries (TGA) occurs the pathway is obstructed because the two main arteries are connected to the wrong chambers of the heart.

Surgery is typically required soon after birth. The only way to survive temporarily without surgery is to create leakages that allow some oxygen-rich blood to cross into the oxygen-low blood for delivery to the rest of the body.

Symptoms of Transposition of the Great Arteries (TGA)

Transposition typically diagnosed within the first hours or days of life due to low oxygen levels. Rapid breathing in response to the low oxygen levels is often observed, but the babies are typically described as being “comfortably tachypneic,” or not working markedly hard to accomplish the rapid breathing.

Even when the baby has a ventricular septal defect, a heart murmur is often not observable in the first days or weeks of life. If there is a site where blood mixing allows for safe oxygen levels, children will often develop signs and symptoms of congestive heart failure over the course of the first weeks or months of life.
Untreated, over 50 percent of infants with transposition will die in the first month of life, 90 percent in the first year.

Causes of Transposition of the Great Arteries (TGA) – Antidepressant Use During Pregnancy

Transposition of the great arteries (TGA) typically occurs during fetal growth when the infant’s heart is still developing. The use of SSRI antidepressants such as Zoloft, Paxil, Prozac, Celexa, or Lexapro during all or part of the pregnancy  may significantly increase the risk of congenital heart defects such as transposition of the great arteries (TGA).

Transposition of the Great Arteries (TGA) – Zoloft Lawsuit

If your child was born with transposition of the great arteries (TGA) or other congenital heart defects and an SSRI such as Zoloft, Prozac, Lexapro, Paxil or Celexa was taken during all or part of the pregnancy, then call now for a free SSRI Antidepressant Lawsuit Consultation. You and your child may have a legal right to monetary compensation for damages and injuries. Call 1-800-883-9858 or fill out the form on the right for your free legal consultation.


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