Articles tagged: Paxil

Back in 2006, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced that research evaluations of the prescription antidepressant Paxil discovered that taking Paxil during pregnancy, specifically during the first three months of pregnancy, may significantly raise the risk of having an infant with birth defects. The most common Paxil birth defects found were congenital (present at birth) heart defects.

Paxil is a popular antidepressant medication and is part of a class of antidepressants called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). SSRI antidepressants work by altering certain chemical levels in the brain used to communicate called neurotransmitters. A lot of scientific experts believe that depression is a result of an imbalance in the numbers of different neurotransmitters in the brain. Other antidepressants in the SSRI class include Zoloft, Prozac, Celexa, and Effexor. Paxil has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat depression and certain other psychiatric disorders.

Two studies examined by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) determined that women who took Paxil during the first trimester of pregnancy were approximately twice as likely to have an infant suffering from a heart defect compared to women who took other antidepressants during pregnancy. The majority of the Paxil heart defects found in the research study were atrial and ventricular septal defects which are holes in the chamber walls in the heart.

Atrial and ventricular septal defects may vary greatly in severity. In some cases they can be fairly minor, and some are more serious which may require operation or even a heart transplant early in life. Among the general population of pregnancies, these types of heart defects occur in about 1 of every 100 births, but in Paxil pregnancies they occur about twice as frequently.

The FDA report has resulted in the manufacturer of Paxil, Glaxo Smith Kline, changing the warning label on their prescription packaging. Where previously it was a pregnancy category C drug, it is now a pregnancy category D drug. This is a significant change because it now recognizes that studies among pregnant women have demonstrated that Paxil causes a risk to unborn children. The FDA is urging medical professionals not to prescribe Paxil to pregnant women or women who are considering becoming pregnant.

Paxil and Pregnancy Lawsuit: Speak to an Attorney

Many new parents ask themselves what was the cause of my child’s birth defects? Did it happen during pregnancy? The antidepressant Paxil may be linked to causing the development of birth defects of unborn babies, infants, and children when their mothers took them while pregnant.

Our law firm is handling individual birth defect lawsuits against drug and pharmaceutical companies and currently accepting new Paxil cases across the nation. If your child was born with a birth injury that you believe may have been caused by taking an antidepressant like Paxil during pregnancy, then you should contact our law firm as soon as possible for a free confidential review of your potential birth defect lawsuit case. All cases are handled on a Contingency Fee Basis (no attorney’s fees or expenses charged unless we recover for you).

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Study Links Autism to Antidepressants Taken During Pregnancy

Infants who are born to mothers taking SSRI antidepressants like Zoloft, Prozac, Paxil, Effexor, Celexa and Lexapro during all or part of pregnancy are twice as likely as other infants to be diagnosed with autism or a related disorder, according to a recent study, one of the first studies to thoroughly examine the correlation between autism and other antidepressant use.

The study suggests that a certain class of antidepressants (which includes new Zoloft, Prozac, Effexor, Paxil, Celexa and Lexapro) called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) can be especially risky if taken early on during pregnancy. In many cases, children of mothers taking antidepressants such as Zoloft during pregnancy are up to four times as likely to have autism. Infants whose mothers took antidepressants during the first trimester of pregnancy were almost four times as likely to develop an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) as compared with unexposed children according to the study found in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

According to Tim Oberlander, M.D., a professor of developmental pediatrics from the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, “Poor maternal mental health during pregnancy is a major public health issue… Some children might be at risk from an SSRI exposure-and we don’t know who, and how that works-there are many mothers and their children as well who will benefit.”

Antidepressant Drugs Include:

  • Zoloft (Generic: sertraline)
  • Prozac (Generic: fluoxetine)
  • Paxil (Generic: paroxetine)

Antidepressant Autism Lawsuit: Speak to an Attorney

Many new parents ask themselves what was the cause of my child’s Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)? Did it happen during pregnancy? The following antidepressants (SSRI’s) may be linked to causing the development of an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) of unborn babies, infants, and children when their mothers took them while pregnant:

  • Zoloft (sertraline)
  • Prozac (fluoxetine)
  • Paxil (paroxetine)
  • Celexa (citalopram)
  • Lexapro (escitalopram)
  • Effexor (venlafaxine)

Our law firm is handling individual birth defect and autism lawsuits against drug and pharmaceutical companies and currently accepting new Zoloft, Prozac, Paxil, Celexa and Lexapro cases. If your child was born with a severe heart defect, birth injury or autism that you believe may have been caused by taking an antidepressant during pregnancy, then you should contact our law firm as soon as possible for a free confidential review of your potential birth defect lawsuit case. All cases are handled on a Contingency Fee Basis (no attorney’s fees or expenses charged unless we recover for you).

What is Patent Ductus Arteriosis?

Patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) is a condition in which there is a persistent opening between two important blood vessels leading  from the heart. Patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) is a congenital birth defect, meaning that it is present at the time of birth. If patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) is left untreated it may cause excess blood flow through the heart which may deteriorate the heart muscle and ultimately cause other complications such as heart failure.

Infants with a larger patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) frequently will have a hard time gaining weight, and may show other symptoms. An older child with patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) may not have as much energy or be as active as normal. They may also have recurrent lung infections.

Symptoms of Patent Ductus Arteriosis (PDA)

A large patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) may show signs of heart failure shortly after birth. A doctor may first notice the heart defect during a routine checkup while they listen to the infant’s heart through a stethoscope.Symptoms of a large patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) may include some or all of the following:

  • Frequent lung infections
  • A bluish or dusky skin tone
  • Persistent fast breathing or breathlessness
  • Poor eating, poor growth
  • Sweating with crying or play
  • Easy tiring
  • Rapid heart rate

Causes of Patent Ductus Arteriosis – Use During Pregnancy

Patent ductus arteriosis (PDA)  tends to occur during fetal growth when the infant’s heart is still developing. The use of SSRI antidepressants such as Zoloft, Paxil, Prozac, Celexa, or Lexapro during all or part of the pregnancy may significantly increase the risk of a congenital heart defect such as patent ductus arteriosis (PDA).

Patent Ductus Arteriosis – Antidepressant Lawsuit

If your child was born with patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) or other congenital heart defects and an antidepressant such as Zoloft, Prozac, Lexapro, Paxil or Celexa was taken during all or part of the pregnancy, then call now for a free consultation with an SSRI Antidepressant Lawyer. You and your child may have a legal right to monetary compensation for damages and injuries. Call 1-800-883-9858 or fill out the form on the right for your free legal consultation.

 

What is Pulmonary Atresia?

Pulmonary atresia (PA) is a defect in which the valve that lets blood flow from the lower right chamber (right ventricle) of the heart to the lungs (pulmonary valve) has not formed correctly or is closed (atresia). Pulmonary atresia is a rare congenital heart defect, meaning that it is a defect that develops during prenatal growth.

While still in the womb, the baby receives oxygen from the placenta before the lungs begin to function. Normally, blood from the right side of the infant’s heart passes through a hole that allows oxygen-rich blood to flow to the left portion of the heart and throughout the infant’s body. After birth, the hole closes as blood instead flows through the newborn’s lungs to provide it with oxygen. In infants with pulmonary atresia (PA), the closed valve does not allow the infant’s heart to pump blood to the lungs to gain oxygen. The blood must get to the lungs via an alternate route to provide oxygen to the child.

Symptoms of Pulmonary Atresia (PA)

Most infants that have pulmonary atresia exhibit symptoms during the first few hours of life. However, some infants don’t show signs of pulmonary atresia (PA) until a few days after birth. Some possible signs and symptoms of pulmonary atresia (PA) may include:

  • Tiring easily while feeding
  • Bluish skin tone
  • Fast breathing
  • Working hard to breathe

Causes of PA – Antidepressant Use During Pregnancy

Pulmonary atresia (PA)  tends to occur during fetal growth when the infant’s heart is still developing. The use of SSRI antidepressants such as Zoloft, Paxil, Prozac, Celexa, or Lexapro during all or part of the pregnancy may significantly increase the risk of a congenital heart defect such as pulmonary atresia (PA).

Pulmonary Atresia (PA) – Antidepressant Lawsuit

If your child was born with pulmonary atresia(PA) or other congenital heart defects and an antidepressant such as Zoloft, Prozac, Lexapro, Paxil or Celexa was taken during all or part of the pregnancy, then call now for a free consultation with an SSRI Antidepressant Lawyer. You and your child may have a legal right to monetary compensation for damages and injuries. Call 1-800-883-9858 or fill out the form on the right for your free legal consultation.

What is Complete Atrioventricular Canal Defect?

Complete atrioventricular canal defect (CACD) is the combination of multiple defects of the heart that are present at the time of birth. Complete atrioventricular canal defect, sometimes referred to as endocardial cushion defect or atrioventricular septal defect, happens when there is a hole in between the chambers in the heart and there are problems with the valves that control blood flow within the heart.

Complete atrioventricular canal defect (CACD) lets extra blood circulate to the lungs. Complete atrioventricular canal defect (CACD) overworks the heart and causes it to enlarge. If complete atrioventricular canal defect (CACD) is not treated, it may cause the heart to fail as well as high blood pressure within the lungs. Typically when an infant has complete atrioventricular canal defect, doctors recommend surgery within the first year of a child’s life to reconstruct the valves and close the hole.

Symptoms of Complete Atrioventricular Canal Defect

Symptoms of complete atrioventricular canal defect (CACD) typically develop within the first few weeks of an infant’s life. The symptoms may include some or all of the following:

• Lack of appetite

• Difficulty breathing

• Bluish discoloration of the lips and skin

• Poor weight gain

If the baby has complete atrioventricular canal defect, they may also develop symptoms of heart failure including:

• Decreased alertness

• Swelling in the legs, ankles and feet

• Excessive sweating

• Wheezing

• Irregular or rapid heartbeat

• Fatigue

• Sudden weight gain from fluid retention

Causes of Complete Atrioventricular Canal Defect

Complete atrioventricular canal defect (CACD)  typically occurs during fetal growth when the infant’s heart is still developing. The use of SSRI antidepressants such as Zoloft, Paxil, Prozac, Celexa, or Lexapro during all or part of the pregnancy may significantly increase the risk of a congenital heart defect such as complete atrioventricular canal defect (CACD).

Complete Atrioventricular Canal Defect – Zoloft Lawsuit

If your child was born with complete atrioventricular canal defect (CACD) or other congenital heart defects and an antidepressant such as Zoloft, Prozac, Lexapro, Paxil or Celexa was taken during all or part of the pregnancy, then call now for a free consultation with an SSRI Antidepressant Lawyer. You and your child may have a legal right to monetary compensation for damages and injuries. Call 1-800-883-9858 or fill out the form on the right for your free legal consultation.

 

What is Pulmonary Valve Stenosis?

Pulmonary valve stenosis (PVS) is a disorder where the blood flow from the heart to the lungs is obstructed by a deformed pulmonary valve, or a deformity around the valve (either above or below). Sometimes adults will develop pulmonary valve stenosis (PVS) as a complication of another condition, but more often than not pulmonary valve stenosis (PVS) develops prior to birth.

Pulmonary valve stenosis (PVS) varies from mild cases showing few symptoms to being very serious and debilitating. Mild cases of pulmonary valve stenosis doesn’t usually deteriorate, but the more serious cases may get worse and eventually require surgery.

Symptoms of Pulmonary Valve Stenosis (PVS)

Symptoms of pulmonary valve stenosis (PVS) may include some or all of the following:

• Loss of consciousness

• Heart murmur

• Shortness of breath, especially during exercise

• Fatigue

• Chest pain

Symptoms of pulmonary valve stenosis (PVS) may vary depending on the degree to which the valve is obstructed. People with mild pulmonary stenosis might only exhibit symptoms while exercising or not at all.

Causes of Pulmonary Valve Stenosis (PVS) – The Use of Antidepressants During Pregnancy

Pulmonary valve stenosis (PVS) typically occurs when the pulmonary valve does not grow correctly during fetal development. Other heart abnormalities are sometimes present at birth (congenital) in infants who have pulmonary valve stenosis. The use of antidepressants such as Zoloft, Paxil, Prozac, Celexa, or Lexapro during all or part of the pregnancy may significantly increase the risk of congenital heart defects such as pulmonary valve stenosis (PVS).

Pulmonary Valve Stenosis (PVS) – Lawsuit

If your child was born with pulmonary valve stenosis (PVS) or other congenital heart defects and an SSRI such as Zoloft, Prozac, Lexapro, Paxil or Celexa was taken during all or part of the pregnancy, then call now for a free SSRI Antidepressant Lawsuit Consultation. You and your child may have a legal right to monetary compensation for damages and injuries. Call 1-800-883-9858 or fill out the form on the right for your free legal consultation.

What is Coarctation of the Aorta?

Coarctation of the Aorta (CoA) is the narrowing of the aorta, the larger blood vessel that branches off from the heart and brings oxygen-rich blood to the rest of the body. If coarctation of the aorta occurs, the heart has to work harder to pump blood through the narrow section of the aorta. Coarctation of the aorta may occur anywhere along the aorta, but the coarctation is usually located near a blood vessel called the ductus arteriosus.

Typically, coarctation of the aorta is present at birth. Coarctation of the aorta can vary from mild to very severe, and is oftentimes not detected until adulthood. There are usually other heart defects present along with coarctation of the aorta. Coarctation of the aorta requires careful attention and follow-up from infancy through adulthood.

Symptoms of Coarctation of the Aorta (CoA)

The signs and symptoms of coarctation of the aorta depend on the severity. Children with severe aortic narrowing will often exhibit signs and symptoms earlier in life, while mild cases may not be recognized until later in adulthood.Babies with severe coarctation of the aorta usually begin having signs and symptoms shortly after birth. Symptoms of coarctation of the aorta may include some or all of the following:

• Difficulty breathing

• Pale skin

• Irritability

• Heavy sweating

If untreated, aortic coarctation in babies may lead to heart failure and death.

Causes of Coarctation of the Aorta (CoA) – The Use of Antidepressants During Pregnancy

Coarctation of the aorta (CoA) typically occurs when the pulmonary valve does not grow correctly during fetal development. Other heart abnormalities are sometimes present at birth (congenital) in infants who have coarctation of the aorta. The use of SSRI antidepressants such as Zoloft, Paxil, Prozac, Celexa, or Lexapro during all or part of the pregnancy may significantly increase the risk of congenital heart defects such as coartation of the aorta (CoA).

Coarctation of the Aorta (CoA) – Lawsuit

If your child was born with coarctation of the aorta (CoA) or other congenital heart defects and an SSRI such as Zoloft, Prozac, Lexapro, Paxil or Celexa was taken during all or part of the pregnancy, then call now for a free SSRI Antidepressant Lawsuit Consultation. You and your child may have a legal right to monetary compensation for damages and injuries. Call 1-800-883-9858 or fill out the form on the right for your free legal consultation.

 

What is Ebstein’s Anomaly?

Ebstein’s anomaly is a rare defect of the heart typically present from birth (congenital). In a patient with Ebstein’s anomaly, the tricuspid valve (valve between the right chambers of the heart) don’t work correctly. Blood will leak back through the valve, making the heart work less efficiently. Ebstein’s anomaly can also lead the heart becoming enlarged or even heart failure. As with many conditions, the severity of Ebstein’s anomaly may range from minimal side effects to very severe. Ebstein’s anomaly is commonly seen along with an atrial septal defect (hole in the wall dividing the two upper chambers of the heart).

Ebstein anomaly is typically characterized by a severely deformed and displaced tricuspid valve. As a result, blood regurgitates or leaks backwards from the right ventricle into the right atrium. This syndrome also characterizes an opening in the septum between the atria (ASD). The ASD allows oxygen-poor blood to flow from the right atrium into oxygen-rich blood of the left atrium causing cyanosis (blueness of the skin).

Symptoms of Ebstein’s Anomaly

Some more mild forms of Ebstein’s anomaly might not show symptoms until adulthood. Some of the symptoms may include:

• Heart palpitations or abnormal heart rhythms

• Fatigue, especially with exertion

• Shortness of breath

• Leg swelling

• A bluish discoloration of the lips and skin caused by low oxygen

Causes of Ebstein’s Anomaly – Antidepressant Use During Pregnancy

Ebstein’s anomaly typically occurs because of improper development of the heart during pregnancy. Other heart abnormalities are sometimes present at birth (congenital) in infants who have Epstein’s anomaly. The use of SSRI antidepressants such as Zoloft, Paxil, Prozac, Celexa, or Lexapro during all or part of the pregnancy may significantly increase the risk of congenital heart defects such as Epstein’s anomaly.

Ebstein’s Anomaly – Birth Defect Lawsuit

If your child was born with Ebstein’s anomaly or other congenital heart defects and an SSRI such as Zoloft, Prozac, Lexapro, Paxil or Celexa was taken during all or part of the pregnancy, then call now for a free SSRI Antidepressant Lawsuit Consultation. You and your child may have a legal right to monetary compensation for damages and injuries. Call 1-800-883-9858 or fill out the form on the right for your free legal consultation.

 

What is Transposition of the Great Arteries?


Transposition of the great arteries (TGA) occurs when an infant is born with the two main arteries carrying blood from the heart reversed. Normally, the blood flows from body to heart to lungs to heart to body, but when transposition of the great arteries (TGA) occurs the pathway is obstructed because the two main arteries are connected to the wrong chambers of the heart.

Surgery is typically required soon after birth. The only way to survive temporarily without surgery is to create leakages that allow some oxygen-rich blood to cross into the oxygen-low blood for delivery to the rest of the body.

Symptoms of Transposition of the Great Arteries (TGA)

Transposition typically diagnosed within the first hours or days of life due to low oxygen levels. Rapid breathing in response to the low oxygen levels is often observed, but the babies are typically described as being “comfortably tachypneic,” or not working markedly hard to accomplish the rapid breathing.

Even when the baby has a ventricular septal defect, a heart murmur is often not observable in the first days or weeks of life. If there is a site where blood mixing allows for safe oxygen levels, children will often develop signs and symptoms of congestive heart failure over the course of the first weeks or months of life.
Untreated, over 50 percent of infants with transposition will die in the first month of life, 90 percent in the first year.

Causes of Transposition of the Great Arteries (TGA) – Antidepressant Use During Pregnancy

Transposition of the great arteries (TGA) typically occurs during fetal growth when the infant’s heart is still developing. The use of SSRI antidepressants such as Zoloft, Paxil, Prozac, Celexa, or Lexapro during all or part of the pregnancy  may significantly increase the risk of congenital heart defects such as transposition of the great arteries (TGA).

Transposition of the Great Arteries (TGA) – Zoloft Lawsuit

If your child was born with transposition of the great arteries (TGA) or other congenital heart defects and an SSRI such as Zoloft, Prozac, Lexapro, Paxil or Celexa was taken during all or part of the pregnancy, then call now for a free SSRI Antidepressant Lawsuit Consultation. You and your child may have a legal right to monetary compensation for damages and injuries. Call 1-800-883-9858 or fill out the form on the right for your free legal consultation.

 

What is Transposition of the Great Vessels?

Transposition of the great vessels (TGV) is a rare heart defect that is typically present at birth. In transposition of the great vessels the two main articles leaving the heart are transposed (reversed). Transposition of the great vessels alters the way that blood circulates throughout the body which leaves a deficiency of blood flowing from the heart to the remainder of the body.

Lacking an adequate supply of oxygen-rich blood, the body is unable to function properly. Transposition of the great vessels is usually detected within the first few weeks of life. Surgery soon after birth is typically required for babies having transposition of the great vessels.

Symptoms of Transposition of the Great Vessels (TGV)

Symptoms of transposition of the great vessels typically include some or all of the following:

• Lack of appetite

• Poor weight gain

• Blue color of the skin

• Shortness of breath

Causes of Transposition of the Great Vessels – Antidepressant Use During Pregnancy

Transposition of the great vessels (TGV) typically occurs during fetal growth when the infant’s heart is still developing. The use of SSRI antidepressants such as Zoloft, Paxil, Prozac, Celexa, or Lexapro during all or part of the pregnancy may significantly increase the risk of a congenital heart defect such as transposition of the great vessels (TGV).

Transposition of the Great Vessels – Birth Defect Lawsuit

If your child was born with transposition of the great vessels (TGV) or other congenital heart defects and an SSRI such as Zoloft, Prozac, Lexapro, Paxil or Celexa was taken during all or part of the pregnancy, then call now for a free SSRI Antidepressant Lawsuit Consultation. You and your child may have a legal right to monetary compensation for damages and injuries. Call 1-800-883-9858 or fill out the form on the right for your free legal consultation.