Articles tagged: SSRI

EffexorChildren born with cardiac and other serious congenital birth defects have potentially been linked to use of the anti-depressant drug Effexor (venlafaxine). Research suggests serious Effexor side effects, including the increased risk of congenital heart defects and other congenital birth defects including:


This link between Effexor (venlafaxine), congenital heart defects and birth defects has many concerned that pregnant women should not be prescribed the antidepressant medication Effexor, especially in the first trimester of pregnancy.

Antidepressant Drugs Include:

  • Zoloft (Generic: sertraline)
  • Prozac (Generic: fluoxetine)
  • Paxil (Generic: paroxetine)
  • Celexa (Generic: citalopram)
  • Lexapro (Generic: escitalopram)
  • Effexor (Generic: venlafaxine)

What is Effexor?

Effexor (venlafaxine) is included in a group of medications called Selective Serotonin Re-uptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) that work by boosting serotonin levels in the brain, resulting in the regulation of mood, sleep and appetite. Effexor (venlafaxine) affects chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced and cause symptoms. Effexor (venlafaxine) is used to treat depression, bulimia nervosa, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), panic disorder, anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD).In May 2005, researchers from the University of Pittsburgh, estimated in the Journal of the American Medical Association, that in any given year at least 80,000 pregnant women in the U.S. are prescribed SSRIs, with Effexor as one of those.

Effexor, along with other SSRIs have been linked to serious side effects. Among reported Effexor side effects are an increased risk of congenital heart defects, Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension of the Newborn (PPHN) and serious withdrawal symptoms.

In 2004, Health Canada advised of potential adverse effects of SSRIs and other anti-depressants on newborns. This notification was intended to increase awareness among mothers and physicians of the possible symptoms and side effects that may occur in the newborn, so that symptoms could be recognized and addressed immediately.

Effexor Heart Defects

SSRI antidepressants like Effexor, Zoloft, Prozac, Paxil and Celexa have been linked to cases of serious congenital heart defects, which may include atrial septal defects (ASD), ventricular septal defects (VSD), tetrology of fallot (ToF), hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), transposition of the great arteries (TGA or TOGA), patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), total anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR), double outlet right ventricle (DORV), and coarctation of the aorta (CoA). In many cases, surgery is required when the child is very young (first three years of life) and then again, potentially multiple times, as the child grows to adulthood. Most congenital heart defects are treatable when they are diagnosed and addressed early on. Children may then be able to lead a mostly normal and productive life following medical attention. In some cases, the only viable option to correct these severe heart defects and preserve the child’s life involves a heart transplant.

In 2005, a Danish study indicated that pregnant women prescribed SSRI antidepressant medicines like Effexor in early pregnancy may have increased risk of giving birth to infants with congenital heart problems. In this study, infants exposed to SSRI antidepressants like Effexor, Zoloft, Prozac and Paxil during the first 3 months of pregnancy had a 60 percent higher chance of developing congenital heart defects compared with infants whose mothers did not take Effexor or other SSRI antidepressants. In the Diav-Citrin Study it was shown that Effexor increases the risk of Cardiovascular defects four and a half times and it doubles the risk of major abnormalities overall.

It is also known is that there is a strong link between SSRI antidepressants and other congenital malformations, including lung, cranio-facial, limb (arm, hand, leg, foot) and abdominal wall malformations. A study conducted at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark, revealed that the risk of pregnant women giving birth to babies with congenital defects, including heart and other defects, was increased among women who had prescriptions for SSRIs such as Effexor filled in the 30 days before conception through the end of the first trimester, compared with those who had no SSRI prescriptions filled during the same period. The Alwan 2007 study showed an almost three times increase risk of Craniosynostosis which is when the plates of the skull prematurely close. The Alwan study also showed an increased risk associated with SSRI’s as a group, for Anencephaly, Craniosynostosis and Omphalocele.

Women who are taking SSRI antidepressants, including Effexor, who are pregnant or thinking about becoming pregnant should speak with their doctor about the risks associated with taking Effexor or any other SSRI while pregnant. There are risks associated with taking Effexor while pregnant, and there may also be concerns about discontinuing medication. All Birth Defect risks should be discussed with a physician and balanced against any possible benefits of taking this medication.

Congenital Heart Defects from Antidepressant SSRI Drugs:

SSRI Antidepressant Congenital Birth Defects:

Effexor Autism

A recent study published by Archives of General Psychiatry has found a link between antidepressant use during pregnancy and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Pregnant women taking Effexor antidepressants during the first trimester of pregnancy may triple the chances of their child having Effexor autism. This study was prompted when researchers noticed a rise over the past few years in the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant (SSRIs) and an increase in Effexor autism diagnoses.

Effexor Autism Side Effects

  • Autism from Effexor
  • ASD – Autism Spectrum Disorder
  • PDD – Pervasive Developmental Disorder
  • PDD – NOS – Pervasive Developmental Disorder – Not Otherwise Specified

If you or a loved one took Effexor while pregnant and have a child that may suffer Effexor autism or other Effexor birth defects, contact our law firm immediately to discuss the legal options available to you and your family.

See also: Autism Lawsuit: Antidepressants During Pregnancy Increase Autism Risk

Speak to an Effexor Lawyer

If you took Effexor or generic venlafaxine during pregnancy and your child was born with a heart birth defect or a lung birth defect, we encourage you to contact a Effexor heart defect litigation attorney at our law firm immediately. It may be too late to recover from the devastating effects of Effexor heart defects, but an experienced products liability Effexor attorney at the Willis Law Firm can assist you in legal action against the makers of Effexor. You are not alone. Join other Effexor heart defect, Effexor lung defect, and other Effexor birth defect victims and their families in speaking up and fighting for your legal rights.

Effexor Birth Defect Lawsuit

Please fill out our free online legal evaluation form and we will contact you within 24 hours. Please keep in mind that certain states have statutes of limitation that limit the amount of time you have to file a lawsuit or seek legal action. Contact a Effexor heart defect lawyer at our law firm immediately so we may explain the rights and options available to you and your family.

What is Patent Ductus Arteriosis?

Patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) is a condition in which there is a persistent opening between two important blood vessels leading  from the heart. Patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) is a congenital birth defect, meaning that it is present at the time of birth. If patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) is left untreated it may cause excess blood flow through the heart which may deteriorate the heart muscle and ultimately cause other complications such as heart failure.

Infants with a larger patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) frequently will have a hard time gaining weight, and may show other symptoms. An older child with patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) may not have as much energy or be as active as normal. They may also have recurrent lung infections.

Symptoms of Patent Ductus Arteriosis (PDA)

A large patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) may show signs of heart failure shortly after birth. A doctor may first notice the heart defect during a routine checkup while they listen to the infant’s heart through a stethoscope.Symptoms of a large patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) may include some or all of the following:

  • Frequent lung infections
  • A bluish or dusky skin tone
  • Persistent fast breathing or breathlessness
  • Poor eating, poor growth
  • Sweating with crying or play
  • Easy tiring
  • Rapid heart rate

Causes of Patent Ductus Arteriosis – Use During Pregnancy

Patent ductus arteriosis (PDA)  tends to occur during fetal growth when the infant’s heart is still developing. The use of SSRI antidepressants such as Zoloft, Paxil, Prozac, Celexa, or Lexapro during all or part of the pregnancy may significantly increase the risk of a congenital heart defect such as patent ductus arteriosis (PDA).

Patent Ductus Arteriosis – Antidepressant Lawsuit

If your child was born with patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) or other congenital heart defects and an antidepressant such as Zoloft, Prozac, Lexapro, Paxil or Celexa was taken during all or part of the pregnancy, then call now for a free consultation with an SSRI Antidepressant Lawyer. You and your child may have a legal right to monetary compensation for damages and injuries. Call 1-800-883-9858 or fill out the form on the right for your free legal consultation.

 

What is Pulmonary Atresia?

Pulmonary atresia (PA) is a defect in which the valve that lets blood flow from the lower right chamber (right ventricle) of the heart to the lungs (pulmonary valve) has not formed correctly or is closed (atresia). Pulmonary atresia is a rare congenital heart defect, meaning that it is a defect that develops during prenatal growth.

While still in the womb, the baby receives oxygen from the placenta before the lungs begin to function. Normally, blood from the right side of the infant’s heart passes through a hole that allows oxygen-rich blood to flow to the left portion of the heart and throughout the infant’s body. After birth, the hole closes as blood instead flows through the newborn’s lungs to provide it with oxygen. In infants with pulmonary atresia (PA), the closed valve does not allow the infant’s heart to pump blood to the lungs to gain oxygen. The blood must get to the lungs via an alternate route to provide oxygen to the child.

Symptoms of Pulmonary Atresia (PA)

Most infants that have pulmonary atresia exhibit symptoms during the first few hours of life. However, some infants don’t show signs of pulmonary atresia (PA) until a few days after birth. Some possible signs and symptoms of pulmonary atresia (PA) may include:

  • Tiring easily while feeding
  • Bluish skin tone
  • Fast breathing
  • Working hard to breathe

Causes of PA – Antidepressant Use During Pregnancy

Pulmonary atresia (PA)  tends to occur during fetal growth when the infant’s heart is still developing. The use of SSRI antidepressants such as Zoloft, Paxil, Prozac, Celexa, or Lexapro during all or part of the pregnancy may significantly increase the risk of a congenital heart defect such as pulmonary atresia (PA).

Pulmonary Atresia (PA) – Antidepressant Lawsuit

If your child was born with pulmonary atresia(PA) or other congenital heart defects and an antidepressant such as Zoloft, Prozac, Lexapro, Paxil or Celexa was taken during all or part of the pregnancy, then call now for a free consultation with an SSRI Antidepressant Lawyer. You and your child may have a legal right to monetary compensation for damages and injuries. Call 1-800-883-9858 or fill out the form on the right for your free legal consultation.

What is Complete Atrioventricular Canal Defect?

Complete atrioventricular canal defect (CACD) is the combination of multiple defects of the heart that are present at the time of birth. Complete atrioventricular canal defect, sometimes referred to as endocardial cushion defect or atrioventricular septal defect, happens when there is a hole in between the chambers in the heart and there are problems with the valves that control blood flow within the heart.

Complete atrioventricular canal defect (CACD) lets extra blood circulate to the lungs. Complete atrioventricular canal defect (CACD) overworks the heart and causes it to enlarge. If complete atrioventricular canal defect (CACD) is not treated, it may cause the heart to fail as well as high blood pressure within the lungs. Typically when an infant has complete atrioventricular canal defect, doctors recommend surgery within the first year of a child’s life to reconstruct the valves and close the hole.

Symptoms of Complete Atrioventricular Canal Defect

Symptoms of complete atrioventricular canal defect (CACD) typically develop within the first few weeks of an infant’s life. The symptoms may include some or all of the following:

• Lack of appetite

• Difficulty breathing

• Bluish discoloration of the lips and skin

• Poor weight gain

If the baby has complete atrioventricular canal defect, they may also develop symptoms of heart failure including:

• Decreased alertness

• Swelling in the legs, ankles and feet

• Excessive sweating

• Wheezing

• Irregular or rapid heartbeat

• Fatigue

• Sudden weight gain from fluid retention

Causes of Complete Atrioventricular Canal Defect

Complete atrioventricular canal defect (CACD)  typically occurs during fetal growth when the infant’s heart is still developing. The use of SSRI antidepressants such as Zoloft, Paxil, Prozac, Celexa, or Lexapro during all or part of the pregnancy may significantly increase the risk of a congenital heart defect such as complete atrioventricular canal defect (CACD).

Complete Atrioventricular Canal Defect – Zoloft Lawsuit

If your child was born with complete atrioventricular canal defect (CACD) or other congenital heart defects and an antidepressant such as Zoloft, Prozac, Lexapro, Paxil or Celexa was taken during all or part of the pregnancy, then call now for a free consultation with an SSRI Antidepressant Lawyer. You and your child may have a legal right to monetary compensation for damages and injuries. Call 1-800-883-9858 or fill out the form on the right for your free legal consultation.

 

What is Pulmonary Valve Stenosis?

Pulmonary valve stenosis (PVS) is a disorder where the blood flow from the heart to the lungs is obstructed by a deformed pulmonary valve, or a deformity around the valve (either above or below). Sometimes adults will develop pulmonary valve stenosis (PVS) as a complication of another condition, but more often than not pulmonary valve stenosis (PVS) develops prior to birth.

Pulmonary valve stenosis (PVS) varies from mild cases showing few symptoms to being very serious and debilitating. Mild cases of pulmonary valve stenosis doesn’t usually deteriorate, but the more serious cases may get worse and eventually require surgery.

Symptoms of Pulmonary Valve Stenosis (PVS)

Symptoms of pulmonary valve stenosis (PVS) may include some or all of the following:

• Loss of consciousness

• Heart murmur

• Shortness of breath, especially during exercise

• Fatigue

• Chest pain

Symptoms of pulmonary valve stenosis (PVS) may vary depending on the degree to which the valve is obstructed. People with mild pulmonary stenosis might only exhibit symptoms while exercising or not at all.

Causes of Pulmonary Valve Stenosis (PVS) – The Use of Antidepressants During Pregnancy

Pulmonary valve stenosis (PVS) typically occurs when the pulmonary valve does not grow correctly during fetal development. Other heart abnormalities are sometimes present at birth (congenital) in infants who have pulmonary valve stenosis. The use of antidepressants such as Zoloft, Paxil, Prozac, Celexa, or Lexapro during all or part of the pregnancy may significantly increase the risk of congenital heart defects such as pulmonary valve stenosis (PVS).

Pulmonary Valve Stenosis (PVS) – Lawsuit

If your child was born with pulmonary valve stenosis (PVS) or other congenital heart defects and an SSRI such as Zoloft, Prozac, Lexapro, Paxil or Celexa was taken during all or part of the pregnancy, then call now for a free SSRI Antidepressant Lawsuit Consultation. You and your child may have a legal right to monetary compensation for damages and injuries. Call 1-800-883-9858 or fill out the form on the right for your free legal consultation.

What is Coarctation of the Aorta?

Coarctation of the Aorta (CoA) is the narrowing of the aorta, the larger blood vessel that branches off from the heart and brings oxygen-rich blood to the rest of the body. If coarctation of the aorta occurs, the heart has to work harder to pump blood through the narrow section of the aorta. Coarctation of the aorta may occur anywhere along the aorta, but the coarctation is usually located near a blood vessel called the ductus arteriosus.

Typically, coarctation of the aorta is present at birth. Coarctation of the aorta can vary from mild to very severe, and is oftentimes not detected until adulthood. There are usually other heart defects present along with coarctation of the aorta. Coarctation of the aorta requires careful attention and follow-up from infancy through adulthood.

Symptoms of Coarctation of the Aorta (CoA)

The signs and symptoms of coarctation of the aorta depend on the severity. Children with severe aortic narrowing will often exhibit signs and symptoms earlier in life, while mild cases may not be recognized until later in adulthood.Babies with severe coarctation of the aorta usually begin having signs and symptoms shortly after birth. Symptoms of coarctation of the aorta may include some or all of the following:

• Difficulty breathing

• Pale skin

• Irritability

• Heavy sweating

If untreated, aortic coarctation in babies may lead to heart failure and death.

Causes of Coarctation of the Aorta (CoA) – The Use of Antidepressants During Pregnancy

Coarctation of the aorta (CoA) typically occurs when the pulmonary valve does not grow correctly during fetal development. Other heart abnormalities are sometimes present at birth (congenital) in infants who have coarctation of the aorta. The use of SSRI antidepressants such as Zoloft, Paxil, Prozac, Celexa, or Lexapro during all or part of the pregnancy may significantly increase the risk of congenital heart defects such as coartation of the aorta (CoA).

Coarctation of the Aorta (CoA) – Lawsuit

If your child was born with coarctation of the aorta (CoA) or other congenital heart defects and an SSRI such as Zoloft, Prozac, Lexapro, Paxil or Celexa was taken during all or part of the pregnancy, then call now for a free SSRI Antidepressant Lawsuit Consultation. You and your child may have a legal right to monetary compensation for damages and injuries. Call 1-800-883-9858 or fill out the form on the right for your free legal consultation.

 

What is Ebstein’s Anomaly?

Ebstein’s anomaly is a rare defect of the heart typically present from birth (congenital). In a patient with Ebstein’s anomaly, the tricuspid valve (valve between the right chambers of the heart) don’t work correctly. Blood will leak back through the valve, making the heart work less efficiently. Ebstein’s anomaly can also lead the heart becoming enlarged or even heart failure. As with many conditions, the severity of Ebstein’s anomaly may range from minimal side effects to very severe. Ebstein’s anomaly is commonly seen along with an atrial septal defect (hole in the wall dividing the two upper chambers of the heart).

Ebstein anomaly is typically characterized by a severely deformed and displaced tricuspid valve. As a result, blood regurgitates or leaks backwards from the right ventricle into the right atrium. This syndrome also characterizes an opening in the septum between the atria (ASD). The ASD allows oxygen-poor blood to flow from the right atrium into oxygen-rich blood of the left atrium causing cyanosis (blueness of the skin).

Symptoms of Ebstein’s Anomaly

Some more mild forms of Ebstein’s anomaly might not show symptoms until adulthood. Some of the symptoms may include:

• Heart palpitations or abnormal heart rhythms

• Fatigue, especially with exertion

• Shortness of breath

• Leg swelling

• A bluish discoloration of the lips and skin caused by low oxygen

Causes of Ebstein’s Anomaly – Antidepressant Use During Pregnancy

Ebstein’s anomaly typically occurs because of improper development of the heart during pregnancy. Other heart abnormalities are sometimes present at birth (congenital) in infants who have Epstein’s anomaly. The use of SSRI antidepressants such as Zoloft, Paxil, Prozac, Celexa, or Lexapro during all or part of the pregnancy may significantly increase the risk of congenital heart defects such as Epstein’s anomaly.

Ebstein’s Anomaly – Birth Defect Lawsuit

If your child was born with Ebstein’s anomaly or other congenital heart defects and an SSRI such as Zoloft, Prozac, Lexapro, Paxil or Celexa was taken during all or part of the pregnancy, then call now for a free SSRI Antidepressant Lawsuit Consultation. You and your child may have a legal right to monetary compensation for damages and injuries. Call 1-800-883-9858 or fill out the form on the right for your free legal consultation.

 

What is Transposition of the Great Arteries?


Transposition of the great arteries (TGA) occurs when an infant is born with the two main arteries carrying blood from the heart reversed. Normally, the blood flows from body to heart to lungs to heart to body, but when transposition of the great arteries (TGA) occurs the pathway is obstructed because the two main arteries are connected to the wrong chambers of the heart.

Surgery is typically required soon after birth. The only way to survive temporarily without surgery is to create leakages that allow some oxygen-rich blood to cross into the oxygen-low blood for delivery to the rest of the body.

Symptoms of Transposition of the Great Arteries (TGA)

Transposition typically diagnosed within the first hours or days of life due to low oxygen levels. Rapid breathing in response to the low oxygen levels is often observed, but the babies are typically described as being “comfortably tachypneic,” or not working markedly hard to accomplish the rapid breathing.

Even when the baby has a ventricular septal defect, a heart murmur is often not observable in the first days or weeks of life. If there is a site where blood mixing allows for safe oxygen levels, children will often develop signs and symptoms of congestive heart failure over the course of the first weeks or months of life.
Untreated, over 50 percent of infants with transposition will die in the first month of life, 90 percent in the first year.

Causes of Transposition of the Great Arteries (TGA) – Antidepressant Use During Pregnancy

Transposition of the great arteries (TGA) typically occurs during fetal growth when the infant’s heart is still developing. The use of SSRI antidepressants such as Zoloft, Paxil, Prozac, Celexa, or Lexapro during all or part of the pregnancy  may significantly increase the risk of congenital heart defects such as transposition of the great arteries (TGA).

Transposition of the Great Arteries (TGA) – Zoloft Lawsuit

If your child was born with transposition of the great arteries (TGA) or other congenital heart defects and an SSRI such as Zoloft, Prozac, Lexapro, Paxil or Celexa was taken during all or part of the pregnancy, then call now for a free SSRI Antidepressant Lawsuit Consultation. You and your child may have a legal right to monetary compensation for damages and injuries. Call 1-800-883-9858 or fill out the form on the right for your free legal consultation.

 

What is Transposition of the Great Vessels?

Transposition of the great vessels (TGV) is a rare heart defect that is typically present at birth. In transposition of the great vessels the two main articles leaving the heart are transposed (reversed). Transposition of the great vessels alters the way that blood circulates throughout the body which leaves a deficiency of blood flowing from the heart to the remainder of the body.

Lacking an adequate supply of oxygen-rich blood, the body is unable to function properly. Transposition of the great vessels is usually detected within the first few weeks of life. Surgery soon after birth is typically required for babies having transposition of the great vessels.

Symptoms of Transposition of the Great Vessels (TGV)

Symptoms of transposition of the great vessels typically include some or all of the following:

• Lack of appetite

• Poor weight gain

• Blue color of the skin

• Shortness of breath

Causes of Transposition of the Great Vessels – Antidepressant Use During Pregnancy

Transposition of the great vessels (TGV) typically occurs during fetal growth when the infant’s heart is still developing. The use of SSRI antidepressants such as Zoloft, Paxil, Prozac, Celexa, or Lexapro during all or part of the pregnancy may significantly increase the risk of a congenital heart defect such as transposition of the great vessels (TGV).

Transposition of the Great Vessels – Birth Defect Lawsuit

If your child was born with transposition of the great vessels (TGV) or other congenital heart defects and an SSRI such as Zoloft, Prozac, Lexapro, Paxil or Celexa was taken during all or part of the pregnancy, then call now for a free SSRI Antidepressant Lawsuit Consultation. You and your child may have a legal right to monetary compensation for damages and injuries. Call 1-800-883-9858 or fill out the form on the right for your free legal consultation.

 

 

What is Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome?

Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a complicated and uncommon heart defect present at birth (congenital). In hypoplastic left heart syndrome, the left portion of the heart is dangerously underdeveloped.

If a baby is born with hypoplastic left heart syndrome, the left portion of the heart cannot efficiently propel blood to the body, consequently the right portion of the heart is required to propel blood to the lungs and to the remainder of the body.

Children suffering from hypoplastic left heart syndrome must take medication in order to stop the closure of the connection of the left and right sides of the heart. In addition to the medication, either surgery or a heart transplant will be necessary. In many cases, hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) has been traced to the use of SSRI antidepressants such as Zoloft, Prozac, Paxil, Lexapro, or Celexa by the mother during all or part of the pregnancy. If you took Zoloft, Prozac, Paxil, Lexapro, or Celexa during pregnancy and your child was born with a congenital heart defect like hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) you and your child might have a legal right to monetary compensation through a SSRI antidepressant lawsuit.

Symptoms of Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome (HLHS)

Babies who are born with hypoplastic left heart syndrome typically are severely ill instantly after being born. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome symptoms may include some of the following:

• Bluish-gray skin color
• Hasty, labored breathing
• Inadequate feeding
• Cold hands and feet
• Being unusually inactive or drowsy

According to medical authorities a baby born with hypoplastic left heart syndrome, once the natural connections between the heart’s left and right sides are allowed to close, may go into shock and could die. Signs of shock may include some or all of the following:

• Clammy skin that may be pale or gray
• A weak and rapid pulse
• Abnormal breathing that may be either slow and shallow or very rapid
• Dilated pupils
• Lackluster eyes that seem to stare

Without surgery, babies with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) may die within a few weeks. With surgery most infants survive hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), but most infants will have some or all of the following complications later in life:

• Developmental problems related to the brain and nervous system
• Tiring especially easily while participating in exercise
• Need for additional heart surgery or transplantation
• Heart rhythm abnormalities
• Formation of blood clots that may lead to a pulmonary embolism or stroke
• Fluid buildup in the lungs, abdomen, legs and feet

Causes of Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome (HLHS) – Antidepressant Use While Pregnant

Heart defects present at birth (congenital heart defects) are a result of errors early in the heart’s development, but it is often hard to determine the exact cause. The use of antidepressants such as Zoloft, Paxil, Prozac, Celexa, or Lexapro during all or part of the pregnancy doubles the risk of a congenital heart defect like hypoplastic left heart syndrome.

Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome (HLHS) – Lawsuit

If your child was born with hypoplastic left heart syndrome or other congenital heart defects and a SSRI such as Zoloft, Prozac, Lexapro, Paxil or Celexa was taken during all or part of the pregnancy, then call now for a free SSRI Antidepressant Lawsuit Consultation. You and your child may have a legal right to monetary compensation for damages and injuries. Fill out the form to the right or call 1-800-883-9858 for your free legal consultation.